Acupuncturist of the Month

Acupuncturist of the Month – Amanda Brown, L.Ac

This month, we sit down with licensed acupuncturist Amanda Brown.  Amanda comes from a background of genetics and biotechnology, and admits she was skeptical when first seeking acupuncture for stomach issues and stress problems.  However, her disposition quickly changed, and after a few sessions of acupuncture, and she noticed her health beginning to improve. Within the next several months, she was in better health, and was making steps toward changing her life. 

Amanda, eager to bring this amazing healing to others, studied acupuncture at the Southwest Acupuncture College in Boulder, Colorado.  In 2010, Amanda graduated and moved to Winston-Salem, NC to practice for several years, and later relocated to Wilmington to be closer to family and enjoy the beach.  Amanda currently works at Infinity Acupuncture, and her ultimate passion is to create a relaxing, healing experience for every person she treats.  With a very gentle technique, Amanda is able to help even the most needle sensitive people. 

How many years have you been practicing acupuncture for?

I have been practicing for over 10 amazing years! Looking forward to many more!

What inspired you to become an acupuncturist?  

I was inspired to be an acupuncturist because of how the medicine changed my life. 

What is one thing about acupuncture & oriental medicine, that to this day, still amazes you?

It amazes me how one single needle can help relieve pain and help patients feel better.

On your journey to become an acupuncturist, what obstacles did you face and how did you overcome them?

I changed professions several times and was in Biotechnology for several years. I worked third shift and struggled with IBS and depression and anxiety. This is when I found acupuncture which helped me overcome these issues and change my life.

Looking back, what advice would you have given to the younger version of yourself, who was just getting started in this profession?

Do what you’re passionate about and not what you think you should do based on other’s opinions.

What has been the most rewarding moment so far in your career as an acupuncturist & oriental medicine provider?

Helping several women with fertility that had struggled for several years!

What is your definition of success?

My definition of success would be helping patients learn to help themselves and realize they can assist in their own journey to feeling better.

Share a recent success story you had with a patient.  What acupuncture points, herbs, or other interventions (meditation, yoga, nutrition, etc) did you use to help them achieve results?

One recent story would be helping someone with extreme back pain and neuropathy. This patient had struggled for many years and had almost no sensation in her feet.

I treated for Qi stagnation and Spleen Qi deficiency.

For the back pain I used local points. For the neuropathy, I used Bafeng extra points and Jing well points in the toes. Within six months, the patient was able to walk without a walker!

We have all occasionally had a patient come into our practice who is upset, frustrated, and a little angry.  Maybe its from work, being stuck in traffic, or life in general – we have all been there!  What advise would you give to fellow acupuncture students and/or colleagues on how to improve a situation like this?

I think patient’s that are frustrated often just need someone to listen. Usually when you actively listen, the patient will realize you are there to help and will relax with treatment.

What condition or illness have you had good success in treating, and why?

I have had success treating anxiety and depression because I have struggled with these most of my adult life. 

Running a practice is not a simple or easy task – what do you feel was the biggest challenge in getting your practice up and running?

I have the privilege to work for an amazing practice!

Sometimes, the best resource for improving our skills is by learning from the other acupuncturists we meet along our professional journey.  What is one thing you learned from a fellow acupuncturist or other holistic practitioner, that has helped you in your professional growth, or in your care for patients?

I have learned that some pain conditions do require stronger needling. I was a little shy to do stronger needling when I started, but I have learned in some conditions it does really help.

Do you have any daily habits or rituals that keep you at your “best-self”, both as an acupuncture practitioner and person?

I know that I feel better when I talk frequent walks in the woods. If I don’t get outside, I tend to get run down.

If it were your last day, and all of your life work was erased, what are 3 pieces of information/advice you would want to leave the world with about acupuncture?

Acupuncture can treat the whole self.

Chinese herbal medicine can absolutely change your life.

You have as much influence in your own healing as your acupuncturist does.

What do you see for the future of acupuncture and what do you want to change?

I hope that Western medicine and Chinese medicine can work together to help patients.

Do you have any favorite acupuncture points?

SP-6 is my favorite point, it’s astounding how many different things it can treat!

What was the best thing a patient said to you recently?

That I really have helped them to feel better and be more positive everyday.

What was the funniest thing a patient ever said to you? 

A pregnant patient said please get this baby out of me! 🙂 

If you had to choose a spirit animal, what would it be and why?

I love owls, they are mysterious and considered wise and mystical. They are my favorite animal.


Have more knowledge or an acupuncture/TCM specialty you want to call attention to and share?

Become our next Acupuncturist of the Month!

 Share your knowledge, highlight your work, and lift up the acupuncture profession for you and other professionals!

Email us at acucontinuingeducation@gmail.com or click here today to learn more.

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